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installing cedar shingles.

 
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ezalpha
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PostPosted: Mon Nov 29, 2004 2:00 am    Post subject: installing cedar shingles. Reply with quote

Can I install cedar shingles directly on the 7/16" OSB plywood sheathing on
the backyard shed I built. Rafters are 16 .o.c. Or do I have to strap with
1 x 3" and attach the shingles to the strapping?
Dave
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Dave Jackson
Guest





PostPosted: Mon Nov 29, 2004 2:00 am    Post subject: Re: installing cedar shingles. Reply with quote

You can install directly to the osb. Make sure the fasteners you use
penetrate the shake and all the way through the osb, just as roofing nails
would. This will keep the fastener from working it's way out. --dave


"ezalpha" <eastaugh@sympatico.ca> wrote in message
news:4Guqd.4405$kI6.224821@news20.bellglobal.com...
Quote:
Can I install cedar shingles directly on the 7/16" OSB plywood sheathing
on the backyard shed I built. Rafters are 16 .o.c. Or do I have to strap
with 1 x 3" and attach the shingles to the strapping?
Dave


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dondone
Guest





PostPosted: Mon Nov 29, 2004 7:00 am    Post subject: Re: installing cedar shingles. Reply with quote

The 1x slats,w appropriate gaps but w/o solid sheathing, are commonally used
in wet climates like the Pacific northwest of the US. This lets air
circulate better in and around wood shakes & shinges to promote quicker
drying for longer life. Keeping them damp promotes mildew growth. Here in
the US southwest, wood shakes (we don't see many wood shingles) are applied
directly over sheathing like your OSB since moisture is not a problem.

"ezalpha" <eastaugh@sympatico.ca> wrote in message
news:4Guqd.4405$kI6.224821@news20.bellglobal.com...
Quote:
Can I install cedar shingles directly on the 7/16" OSB plywood sheathing
on
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Slowhand
Guest





PostPosted: Mon Nov 29, 2004 6:00 pm    Post subject: Re: installing cedar shingles. Reply with quote

"ezalpha" <eastaugh@sympatico.ca> wrote in message
news:4Guqd.4405$kI6.224821@news20.bellglobal.com...
Quote:
Can I install cedar shingles directly on the 7/16" OSB plywood sheathing
on the backyard shed I built. Rafters are 16 .o.c. Or do I have to strap
with 1 x 3" and attach the shingles to the strapping?

Make sure to install tar paper over the osb before you put the shingles on.
SH
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ezalpha
Guest





PostPosted: Tue Nov 30, 2004 1:00 am    Post subject: Re: installing cedar shingles. Reply with quote

Thanks. I bought the 1 x3 and was going to strap it. Then I read where
it's best to sheath about 2' around the perimeter of the roof surface and
strap inside that. One said use tarpaper and another said don't use
tarpaper because it can trap moisture on the underside. In the end, I
sheathed the whole thing. The main determinant for me is that it's getting
cold. I finished the sheathing today, but it's only about 38 degrees. If I
can just get the shingling done before the snow flies I'll be happy.
Another question - the building supply sold me 1 1/2" galvanized nails for
the shingling, but I'd like to avoid all that hammer work. Is there a type
of air-powered nailer and fastener I can use. I'd rent an ashphalt shingle
nailer, but everything I've read says shingles (shakes) are easily split,
and I think an ordinary asphalt-type shingle nail might split the shake.

Dave


"dondone" <someone@somewhere.org> wrote in message
news:WAzqd.368250$a85.192313@fed1read04...
Quote:
The 1x slats,w appropriate gaps but w/o solid sheathing, are commonally
used in wet climates like the Pacific northwest of the US. This lets air
circulate better in and around wood shakes & shinges to promote quicker
drying for longer life. Keeping them damp promotes mildew growth. Here
in the US southwest, wood shakes (we don't see many wood shingles) are
applied directly over sheathing like your OSB since moisture is not a
problem.

"ezalpha" <eastaugh@sympatico.ca> wrote in message
news:4Guqd.4405$kI6.224821@news20.bellglobal.com...
Can I install cedar shingles directly on the 7/16" OSB plywood sheathing
on

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PDQ
Guest





PostPosted: Tue Nov 30, 2004 1:00 am    Post subject: Re: installing cedar shingles. Reply with quote

"ezalpha" <eastaugh@sympatico.ca> wrote in message news:LUOqd.7050$kI6.559757@news20.bellglobal.com...
| Thanks. I bought the 1 x3 and was going to strap it. Then I read where
| it's best to sheath about 2' around the perimeter of the roof surface and
| strap inside that. One said use tarpaper and another said don't use
| tarpaper because it can trap moisture on the underside. In the end, I
| sheathed the whole thing. The main determinant for me is that it's getting
| cold. I finished the sheathing today, but it's only about 38 degrees. If I
| can just get the shingling done before the snow flies I'll be happy.
| Another question - the building supply sold me 1 1/2" galvanized nails for
| the shingling, but I'd like to avoid all that hammer work. Is there a type
| of air-powered nailer and fastener I can use. I'd rent an ashphalt shingle
| nailer, but everything I've read says shingles (shakes) are easily split,
| and I think an ordinary asphalt-type shingle nail might split the shake.
|
| Dave
|
Strapping is a good thing as it helps keep the shingles dry.

An air nailer can do the job if you get the air pressure low enough.
I mannaged to put 1 1/4 inch brads into 1/4 inch plywood without going past the finish layer by setting the gun pressure to 50 psi instead of my usual 90 psi. At 90 the brads went clear through to the substrata. Just waste a few nails in a test shingle.

Shingle nails are usually blunt ended so they punch through the shingle rather than part it. The latter action can cause a shingle to split.

--

PDQ
--

|
| "dondone" <someone@somewhere.org> wrote in message
| news:WAzqd.368250$a85.192313@fed1read04...
| > The 1x slats,w appropriate gaps but w/o solid sheathing, are commonally
| > used in wet climates like the Pacific northwest of the US. This lets air
| > circulate better in and around wood shakes & shinges to promote quicker
| > drying for longer life. Keeping them damp promotes mildew growth. Here
| > in the US southwest, wood shakes (we don't see many wood shingles) are
| > applied directly over sheathing like your OSB since moisture is not a
| > problem.
| >
| > "ezalpha" <eastaugh@sympatico.ca> wrote in message
| > news:4Guqd.4405$kI6.224821@news20.bellglobal.com...
| >> Can I install cedar shingles directly on the 7/16" OSB plywood sheathing
| >> on
| >
| >
|
|
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ezalpha
Guest





PostPosted: Tue Nov 30, 2004 2:00 am    Post subject: Re: installing cedar shingles. Reply with quote

Thanks PDQ ref the brad nailer. If I understand it my normal 1 1/4 " brads
( I think 16 ga but maybe they're 18) is what you're
suggesting? Brads look like they're made of aluminum, so they wouldn't
rust. I'm not too worried about condensation or mould. This is just a
backyard shed I've built and it won't have any plumbing (but I am starting
to think about insulation and maybe an electric baseboard heater. One of my
aims is to move my table saw and jointer activity out of the basement (for
dust reasons). Another was to move out all the lawn and garden stuff that
makes parking the cars in the garage a challenge. Now I'm starting to think
10 x 14 maybe should have been bigger. Anyhow, I'll take up your suggestion
of the brad nailer and fire a few test shots. I wasn't sure this group was
appropriate for construction-type questions, but I couldn't find any others
so I appreciate the pointers. Thanks
"PDQ" <ugotme@here.inv> wrote in message
news:IcPqd.7381$kI6.568168@news20.bellglobal.com...

"ezalpha" <eastaugh@sympatico.ca> wrote in message
news:LUOqd.7050$kI6.559757@news20.bellglobal.com...
| Thanks. I bought the 1 x3 and was going to strap it. Then I read where
| it's best to sheath about 2' around the perimeter of the roof surface and
| strap inside that. One said use tarpaper and another said don't use
| tarpaper because it can trap moisture on the underside. In the end, I
| sheathed the whole thing. The main determinant for me is that it's
getting
| cold. I finished the sheathing today, but it's only about 38 degrees. If
I
| can just get the shingling done before the snow flies I'll be happy.
| Another question - the building supply sold me 1 1/2" galvanized nails for
| the shingling, but I'd like to avoid all that hammer work. Is there a type
| of air-powered nailer and fastener I can use. I'd rent an ashphalt
shingle
| nailer, but everything I've read says shingles (shakes) are easily split,
| and I think an ordinary asphalt-type shingle nail might split the shake.
|
| Dave
|
Strapping is a good thing as it helps keep the shingles dry.

An air nailer can do the job if you get the air pressure low enough.
I mannaged to put 1 1/4 inch brads into 1/4 inch plywood without going past
the finish layer by setting the gun pressure to 50 psi instead of my usual
90 psi. At 90 the brads went clear through to the substrata. Just waste a
few nails in a test shingle.

Shingle nails are usually blunt ended so they punch through the shingle
rather than part it. The latter action can cause a shingle to split.

--

PDQ
--

|
| "dondone" <someone@somewhere.org> wrote in message
| news:WAzqd.368250$a85.192313@fed1read04...
| > The 1x slats,w appropriate gaps but w/o solid sheathing, are commonally
| > used in wet climates like the Pacific northwest of the US. This lets
air
| > circulate better in and around wood shakes & shinges to promote quicker
| > drying for longer life. Keeping them damp promotes mildew growth. Here
| > in the US southwest, wood shakes (we don't see many wood shingles) are
| > applied directly over sheathing like your OSB since moisture is not a
| > problem.
| >
| > "ezalpha" <eastaugh@sympatico.ca> wrote in message
| > news:4Guqd.4405$kI6.224821@news20.bellglobal.com...
| >> Can I install cedar shingles directly on the 7/16" OSB plywood
sheathing
| >> on
| >
| >
|
|
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PDQ
Guest





PostPosted: Tue Nov 30, 2004 5:00 am    Post subject: Re: installing cedar shingles. Reply with quote

Sorry to mis-advise. I did not mean for you to use a brad nailer. It was only for an example of what can be done.

For your shingles, use a proper nail gun and shingle nails. P-C has them in coils. In any event, be sure to turn down the air pressure at the gun as 90 psi will blow right through the shingles.

I can appreciate your saw removal. I got mine into the basement in pieces. Now I hesitate to take them apart to get them out.

To rip an 8 foot board you need 8 feet before and after the saw. To cross-cut you need the same on the sides. Makes for 16X16 and 20X20 would be best. No matter how big the shed, the table saw goes in the middle and all the other stuff goes along the walls.

If you put the saw on wheels, you can manage in a 10X14 as long as you get the saw outside before firing it up and use the shed as an outfeed location for ripping.

--

PDQ
--

"ezalpha" <eastaugh@sympatico.ca> wrote in message news:5GPqd.7654$kI6.580159@news20.bellglobal.com...
| Thanks PDQ ref the brad nailer. If I understand it my normal 1 1/4 " brads
| ( I think 16 ga but maybe they're 18) is what you're
| suggesting? Brads look like they're made of aluminum, so they wouldn't
| rust. I'm not too worried about condensation or mould. This is just a
| backyard shed I've built and it won't have any plumbing (but I am starting
| to think about insulation and maybe an electric baseboard heater. One of my
| aims is to move my table saw and jointer activity out of the basement (for
| dust reasons). Another was to move out all the lawn and garden stuff that
| makes parking the cars in the garage a challenge. Now I'm starting to think
| 10 x 14 maybe should have been bigger. Anyhow, I'll take up your suggestion
| of the brad nailer and fire a few test shots. I wasn't sure this group was
| appropriate for construction-type questions, but I couldn't find any others
| so I appreciate the pointers. Thanks
| "PDQ" <ugotme@here.inv> wrote in message
| news:IcPqd.7381$kI6.568168@news20.bellglobal.com...
|
| "ezalpha" <eastaugh@sympatico.ca> wrote in message
| news:LUOqd.7050$kI6.559757@news20.bellglobal.com...
| | Thanks. I bought the 1 x3 and was going to strap it. Then I read where
| | it's best to sheath about 2' around the perimeter of the roof surface and
| | strap inside that. One said use tarpaper and another said don't use
| | tarpaper because it can trap moisture on the underside. In the end, I
| | sheathed the whole thing. The main determinant for me is that it's
| getting
| | cold. I finished the sheathing today, but it's only about 38 degrees. If
| I
| | can just get the shingling done before the snow flies I'll be happy.
| | Another question - the building supply sold me 1 1/2" galvanized nails for
| | the shingling, but I'd like to avoid all that hammer work. Is there a type
| | of air-powered nailer and fastener I can use. I'd rent an ashphalt
| shingle
| | nailer, but everything I've read says shingles (shakes) are easily split,
| | and I think an ordinary asphalt-type shingle nail might split the shake.
| |
| | Dave
| |
| Strapping is a good thing as it helps keep the shingles dry.
|
| An air nailer can do the job if you get the air pressure low enough.
| I mannaged to put 1 1/4 inch brads into 1/4 inch plywood without going past
| the finish layer by setting the gun pressure to 50 psi instead of my usual
| 90 psi. At 90 the brads went clear through to the substrata. Just waste a
| few nails in a test shingle.
|
| Shingle nails are usually blunt ended so they punch through the shingle
| rather than part it. The latter action can cause a shingle to split.
|
| --
|
| PDQ
| --
|
| |
| | "dondone" <someone@somewhere.org> wrote in message
| | news:WAzqd.368250$a85.192313@fed1read04...
| | > The 1x slats,w appropriate gaps but w/o solid sheathing, are commonally
| | > used in wet climates like the Pacific northwest of the US. This lets
| air
| | > circulate better in and around wood shakes & shinges to promote quicker
| | > drying for longer life. Keeping them damp promotes mildew growth. Here
| | > in the US southwest, wood shakes (we don't see many wood shingles) are
| | > applied directly over sheathing like your OSB since moisture is not a
| | > problem.
| | >
| | > "ezalpha" <eastaugh@sympatico.ca> wrote in message
| | > news:4Guqd.4405$kI6.224821@news20.bellglobal.com...
| | >> Can I install cedar shingles directly on the 7/16" OSB plywood
| sheathing
| | >> on
| | >
| | >
| |
| |
|
|
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dondone
Guest





PostPosted: Tue Nov 30, 2004 3:00 pm    Post subject: Re: installing cedar shingles. Reply with quote

The old pro's tell you that you should hand nail wood shingles and shakes so
as to get just the right set: not enough to dent the shingle, but enough to
just hold the shingle firm. I think that a roofing nail is not the answer
since they are too large in diameter. I would think a regular nail, about
6d and galvanized would do fine. That is what was used for my 20 year-old
shakes that I removed before re-shaking. In spite of that, around here
(Phoenix) and in Seattle the roofers use staples applied with an air powered
stapler to install shakes. Not sure what they use for wood shingles.

"ezalpha" <eastaugh@sympatico.ca> wrote in message
news:LUOqd.7050$kI6.559757@news20.bellglobal.com...
Quote:
Thanks. I bought the 1 x3 and was going to strap it. Then I read where
it's best to sheath about 2' around the perimeter of the roof surface and
strap inside that. One said use tarpaper and another said don't use
tarpaper because it can trap moisture on the underside. In the end, I
sheathed the whole thing. The main determinant for me is that it's
getting cold. I finished the sheathing today, but it's only about 38
degrees. If I can just get the shingling done before the snow flies I'll
be happy. Another question - the building supply sold me 1 1/2" galvanized
nails for the shingling, but I'd like to avoid all that hammer work. Is
there a type of air-powered nailer and fastener I can use. I'd rent an
ashphalt shingle nailer, but everything I've read says shingles (shakes)
are easily split, and I think an ordinary asphalt-type shingle nail might
split the shake.

Dave


"dondone" <someone@somewhere.org> wrote in message
news:WAzqd.368250$a85.192313@fed1read04...
The 1x slats,w appropriate gaps but w/o solid sheathing, are commonally
used in wet climates like the Pacific northwest of the US. This lets air
circulate better in and around wood shakes & shinges to promote quicker
drying for longer life. Keeping them damp promotes mildew growth. Here
in the US southwest, wood shakes (we don't see many wood shingles) are
applied directly over sheathing like your OSB since moisture is not a
problem.

"ezalpha" <eastaugh@sympatico.ca> wrote in message
news:4Guqd.4405$kI6.224821@news20.bellglobal.com...
Can I install cedar shingles directly on the 7/16" OSB plywood sheathing
on



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Tom
Guest





PostPosted: Tue Nov 30, 2004 7:00 pm    Post subject: Re: installing cedar shingles. Reply with quote

someone wrote: >In spite of that, around here
Quote:
(Phoenix) and in Seattle the roofers use staples applied with an air powered
stapler to install shakes. Not sure what they use for wood shingles.

We use the same set-up, shorter shanked staples with a 1/2 inch crown. On
walls, mansards and the like, stainless fasteners are preferred. You'll not get
dark oxide stains that way. There's a nifty mesh underlayment made to install
under cedar, allowing ventilation when they're installed over ply. Tom
Work at your leisure!
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Slowhand
Guest





PostPosted: Tue Nov 30, 2004 7:00 pm    Post subject: Re: installing cedar shingles. Reply with quote

"ezalpha" <eastaugh@sympatico.ca> wrote in message
news:LUOqd.7050$kI6.559757@news20.bellglobal.com...
Quote:
Thanks. I bought the 1 x3 and was going to strap it. Then I read where
it's best to sheath about 2' around the perimeter of the roof surface and
strap inside that. One said use tarpaper and another said don't use
tarpaper because it can trap moisture on the underside.

I live on the north oregon coast and use tar paper. Have for 20 years. I
think we are the moisture capital of the world <g>.

Quote:
Is there a type of air-powered nailer and fastener I can use.

We use narrow crown air staplers. Because of our close proximity to the
ocean, we use 1 1/2"stainless. Spendy buggers! I don't know if you get
much wind in your area but if you do, stay away from brads of any sort. A
good windstorm will find you gathering up kindling from your yard. Ask me
how I know this. <lol>. If you do choose to hand nail it, I would reccomend
a 5 penny shingle nail. Just ask for them at your local building center.
Happy shingling!
SH
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