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10/ 3 wire ??
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James
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PostPosted: Sun Feb 19, 2006 11:01 pm    Post subject: 10/ 3 wire ?? Reply with quote

I am going about 150 feet to a shed, and plan to run number 10 gauge wire.
This is simply a shed, and I want to be able to run power tools and have
some lights in the shed. I plan to use UF wire, and of course go 2 feet
underground.

Someone advised to run 10/3 instead of 10/2, but I forgot the reason
why. It seems they were indicating I could have TWO circuits instead of
one. Is that correct ? If so, then it seems that I could have 2 separate
20 amp circuits, but I am not sure.

When we say 10/3 wire, is that two main live wires, and one common
ground ??

Thanks a lot !!

--James --
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James
Guest





PostPosted: Mon Feb 20, 2006 12:01 am    Post subject: Re: 10/ 3 wire ?? Reply with quote

Thanks to Ralph and RBM for these informative answers !!


--james--
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Red Neckerson
Guest





PostPosted: Mon Feb 20, 2006 12:01 am    Post subject: Re: 10/ 3 wire ?? Reply with quote

"Justin West" <westj@rogers.com> wrote in message
news:1140391953.512411.68470@g44g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...
Quote:
Hi James,

As always, check with local authorities; however, in Canada you can run
multiple hots with a single neutral as long as you use seperate phases.

Be careful!


They have electricity in Canada??!!

***!

Next thing you know you'll have indoor plumming!
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Frank Boettcher
Guest





PostPosted: Mon Feb 20, 2006 12:01 am    Post subject: Re: 10/ 3 wire ?? Reply with quote

On Sun, 19 Feb 2006 17:50:29 -0500, "James" <jnipperxxx@nospamfdn.com>
wrote:

Quote:

I am going about 150 feet to a shed, and plan to run number 10 gauge wire.
This is simply a shed, and I want to be able to run power tools and have
some lights in the shed. I plan to use UF wire, and of course go 2 feet
underground.

Someone advised to run 10/3 instead of 10/2, but I forgot the reason
why. It seems they were indicating I could have TWO circuits instead of
one. Is that correct ? If so, then it seems that I could have 2 separate
20 amp circuits, but I am not sure.

When we say 10/3 wire, is that two main live wires, and one common
ground ??

Thanks a lot !!

--James --


That's what I did. Came off a thirty amp breaker in the main panel

with 10/3 went to a shop and split into two 20 amp circuits at a
subpanel.

My advice, run two. I ran mine thinking I would just use a few tools
and lights. Shop developed into something bigger with several 220
volt machines. I had to run another line out.

Frank
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Justin West
Guest





PostPosted: Mon Feb 20, 2006 12:01 am    Post subject: Re: 10/ 3 wire ?? Reply with quote

Hi James,

As always, check with local authorities; however, in Canada you can run
multiple hots with a single neutral as long as you use seperate phases.

Be careful!

Justin
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Ralph Mowery
Guest





PostPosted: Mon Feb 20, 2006 12:01 am    Post subject: Re: 10/ 3 wire ?? Reply with quote

"James" <jnipperxxx@nospamfdn.com> wrote in message
news:KLOdnUqF4Yeua2XeRVn-gQ@comcast.com...
Quote:

I am going about 150 feet to a shed, and plan to run number 10 gauge wire.
This is simply a shed, and I want to be able to run power tools and have
some lights in the shed. I plan to use UF wire, and of course go 2
feet
underground.

Someone advised to run 10/3 instead of 10/2, but I forgot the reason
why. It seems they were indicating I could have TWO circuits instead of
one. Is that correct ? If so, then it seems that I could have 2
separate
20 amp circuits, but I am not sure.

When we say 10/3 wire, is that two main live wires, and one common
ground ??


When you specify 10/3 wire, you normally get a cable with 4 wires in it.
There will be a black,red,white, and an uninsulated wire. The best way to
wire it is to connect the black and red wires to the breaker box so that you
have 230 volts across them and the white wire is the neutral. There will be
115 volts from the white wire to the black wire and also to the red wire.
The bare wire is the ground and it might be referred to as the green wire.
Number 10 wire is good for 30 amps, but if you are running it 150 feet and
try to use the full 30 amps the voltage drop may be too much.. Try to
ballance the load on the two circuits if you can. This is not always
possiable while using differant tools. You could put the lights on one
circuit that you don't use much and use the other one for the tools.
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RBM
Guest





PostPosted: Mon Feb 20, 2006 12:01 am    Post subject: Re: 10/ 3 wire ?? Reply with quote

Yes, 10/3 will give you two circuits, or one circuit and a spare. It is good
for 30 amps, so would be fine to connector to 20 amp breakers




"James" <jnipperxxx@nospamfdn.com> wrote in message
news:KLOdnUqF4Yeua2XeRVn-gQ@comcast.com...
Quote:

I am going about 150 feet to a shed, and plan to run number 10 gauge wire.
This is simply a shed, and I want to be able to run power tools and have
some lights in the shed. I plan to use UF wire, and of course go 2
feet
underground.

Someone advised to run 10/3 instead of 10/2, but I forgot the reason
why. It seems they were indicating I could have TWO circuits instead of
one. Is that correct ? If so, then it seems that I could have 2
separate
20 amp circuits, but I am not sure.

When we say 10/3 wire, is that two main live wires, and one common
ground ??

Thanks a lot !!

--James --


Back to top
Bob Vaughan
Guest





PostPosted: Mon Feb 20, 2006 12:40 am    Post subject: Re: 10/ 3 wire ?? Reply with quote

In article <230iv1hgoqij8c0m6m9c0rfads6oio3opa@4ax.com>,
Frank Boettcher <fboettcher@comcast.net> wrote:
Quote:
On Sun, 19 Feb 2006 17:50:29 -0500, "James" <jnipperxxx@nospamfdn.com
wrote:


I am going about 150 feet to a shed, and plan to run number 10 gauge wire.
This is simply a shed, and I want to be able to run power tools and have
some lights in the shed. I plan to use UF wire, and of course go 2 feet
underground.

Someone advised to run 10/3 instead of 10/2, but I forgot the reason
why. It seems they were indicating I could have TWO circuits instead of
one. Is that correct ? If so, then it seems that I could have 2 separate
20 amp circuits, but I am not sure.

When we say 10/3 wire, is that two main live wires, and one common
ground ??

Thanks a lot !!

--James --


That's what I did. Came off a thirty amp breaker in the main panel
with 10/3 went to a shop and split into two 20 amp circuits at a
subpanel.

My advice, run two. I ran mine thinking I would just use a few tools
and lights. Shop developed into something bigger with several 220
volt machines. I had to run another line out.


10awg is the minimum size that you can run and legally use as a feeder to a
subpanel. (minimum feeder size is 30 amps).

If you know you are going to have larger loads than just lights and outlets,
rather than running a second line, run larger wire.

Instead of running UF cable, I would run (2) PVC conduits, one for power,
and one for communications. I would make them a minimum of 2" diameter,
maybe 3" for power. Allow for expansion, once the conduit is in the ground,
it's easier to pull new wire, than replace the conduit or buried cable.

For a 150' run, I would go up at least one gauge to allow for voltage drop,
and go up at least one gauge above your intended load to allow for expansion.
That would mean #6, which is rated for 50 amps, would be my suggested minimum,
allowing for a 40 amp subpanel, with allowance for some voltage drop.
Since it is in conduit, you will be pulling individual wires, not UF cable.

You will probably want to pull some phone and CATV cabling in the other
conduit. Just remember that any cabling in underground conduits needs to be
waterproof, and should be considered to be under water.


--
-- Welcome My Son, Welcome To The Machine --
Bob Vaughan | techie @ tantivy.net |
| P.O. Box 19792, Stanford, Ca 94309 |
-- I am Me, I am only Me, And no one else is Me, What could be simpler? --
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Matt Whiting
Guest





PostPosted: Mon Feb 20, 2006 1:02 am    Post subject: Re: 10/ 3 wire ?? Reply with quote

James wrote:

Quote:
I am going about 150 feet to a shed, and plan to run number 10 gauge wire.
This is simply a shed, and I want to be able to run power tools and have
some lights in the shed. I plan to use UF wire, and of course go 2 feet
underground.

Someone advised to run 10/3 instead of 10/2, but I forgot the reason
why. It seems they were indicating I could have TWO circuits instead of
one. Is that correct ? If so, then it seems that I could have 2 separate
20 amp circuits, but I am not sure.

When we say 10/3 wire, is that two main live wires, and one common
ground ??

You can run also 220 and 110 both if you use the third conductor as a
neutral. This would require you to have a separate grounding rod at the
shed. I'm not up on the latest code and I believe it has changed as to
when you may or may not use a ground rod at an outbuilding like this.
I'd check with a local inspector or electrician who is familiar with the
current code.


Matt
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Matt Whiting
Guest





PostPosted: Mon Feb 20, 2006 1:02 am    Post subject: Re: 10/ 3 wire ?? Reply with quote

RBM wrote:

Quote:
Yes, 10/3 will give you two circuits, or one circuit and a spare. It is good
for 30 amps, so would be fine to connector to 20 amp breakers

You can have several circuits if you run it to a small breaker panel in
the shed which is what I'd recommend.

Matt
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EXT
Guest





PostPosted: Mon Feb 20, 2006 1:02 am    Post subject: Canada???? Reply with quote

Yup, we even got telephones without wires and 'puters and funny colored
money.

It is tricky to run the 'lectric heaters in our igloos, you have to keep
turning them off so the ice can harden up again.

We have a 12 lane highway, but you have to watch out for the 18 wheel
snowmobiles, they think they own the road.


"Red Neckerson" <MaryKKKCosmetics@YerCervix.com> wrote in message
news:Gn7Kf.1235$p13.832@trnddc08...
Quote:

"Justin West" <westj@rogers.com> wrote in message
news:1140391953.512411.68470@g44g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...
Hi James,

As always, check with local authorities; however, in Canada you can run
multiple hots with a single neutral as long as you use seperate phases.

Be careful!


They have electricity in Canada??!!

***!

Next thing you know you'll have indoor plumming!

Back to top
Stormin Mormon
Guest





PostPosted: Mon Feb 20, 2006 4:01 am    Post subject: Re: 10/ 3 wire ?? Reply with quote

Oddly enough, we mean two hots, one common, and one ground. total of four
wires.

Red and black are hot, and white is neutral and bare is ground.

--

Christopher A. Young
You can't shout down a troll.
You have to starve them.
..

"James" <jnipperxxx@nospamfdn.com> wrote in message
news:KLOdnUqF4Yeua2XeRVn-gQ@comcast.com...

I am going about 150 feet to a shed, and plan to run number 10 gauge wire.
This is simply a shed, and I want to be able to run power tools and have
some lights in the shed. I plan to use UF wire, and of course go 2 feet
underground.

Someone advised to run 10/3 instead of 10/2, but I forgot the reason
why. It seems they were indicating I could have TWO circuits instead of
one. Is that correct ? If so, then it seems that I could have 2 separate
20 amp circuits, but I am not sure.

When we say 10/3 wire, is that two main live wires, and one common
ground ??

Thanks a lot !!

--James --
Back to top
Al Bundy
Guest





PostPosted: Mon Feb 20, 2006 5:01 am    Post subject: Re: Canada???? Reply with quote

"EXT" <etonks@sunstormADD-DOT-COM> wrote in
news:43f90fdb$0$97853$892e0abb@auth.newsreader.octanews.com:

Quote:
Yup, we even got telephones without wires and 'puters and funny
colored money.

It is tricky to run the 'lectric heaters in our igloos, you have to
keep turning them off so the ice can harden up again.

We have a 12 lane highway, but you have to watch out for the 18 wheel
snowmobiles, they think they own the road.


"Red Neckerson" <MaryKKKCosmetics@YerCervix.com> wrote in message
news:Gn7Kf.1235$p13.832@trnddc08...

"Justin West" <westj@rogers.com> wrote in message
news:1140391953.512411.68470@g44g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...
Hi James,

As always, check with local authorities; however, in Canada you can
run multiple hots with a single neutral as long as you use seperate
phases.

Be careful!


They have electricity in Canada??!!

***!

Next thing you know you'll have indoor plumming!






Quote:
and funny colored money.

lol!


Quote:
It is tricky to run the 'lectric heaters in our igloos

Wood stoves in ice fishing shantys can be a challenge!

Kidding aside though, knew a guy on Lake Champlain near Canada that had a
wood stove in his along with TV, sofa, chairs and then some. This was not
a typical shanty. Occasionally they drilled a hole and fished by accident
when they got drunk enough.
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Guest






PostPosted: Mon Feb 20, 2006 5:01 am    Post subject: Re: 10/ 3 wire ?? Reply with quote

On Sun, 19 Feb 2006 17:50:29 -0500, "James" <jnipperxxx@nospamfdn.com>
wrote:

Quote:

I am going about 150 feet to a shed, and plan to run number 10 gauge wire.
This is simply a shed, and I want to be able to run power tools and have
some lights in the shed. I plan to use UF wire, and of course go 2 feet
underground.

Someone advised to run 10/3 instead of 10/2, but I forgot the reason
why. It seems they were indicating I could have TWO circuits instead of
one. Is that correct ? If so, then it seems that I could have 2 separate
20 amp circuits, but I am not sure.

When we say 10/3 wire, is that two main live wires, and one common
ground ??

Thanks a lot !!

--James --




Don't confuse this any more than you have to. Feed it from a 2 pole
20a breaker in the house and use GFCI receptacles in a 4" square box
as soon as it gets ointo the shed. Feed 12/2 to the rest of the down
stream outlets connected to the "load" side of the GFCI.

If you put another sub panel out there you kick a whole other can of
worms, ground rods etc. This "multi-wire" circuit is just ONE circuit
in NEC speak so your life is easier. You can still tap off of the
"line" side of the GFCI with both phases to feed 240 volt outlets.
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Guest






PostPosted: Mon Feb 20, 2006 6:01 am    Post subject: Re: 10/ 3 wire ?? Reply with quote

On Sun, 19 Feb 2006 17:50:29 -0500, "James" <jnipperxxx@nospamfdn.com>
wrote:

Quote:

I am going about 150 feet to a shed, and plan to run number 10 gauge wire.
This is simply a shed, and I want to be able to run power tools and have
some lights in the shed. I plan to use UF wire, and of course go 2 feet
underground.

Someone advised to run 10/3 instead of 10/2, but I forgot the reason
why. It seems they were indicating I could have TWO circuits instead of
one. Is that correct ? If so, then it seems that I could have 2 separate
20 amp circuits, but I am not sure.

When we say 10/3 wire, is that two main live wires, and one common
ground ??

Thanks a lot !!

--James --



Yes, and that way you also have 220 access for something like a 220
air compressor motor. Of course if you even plan to get a welder and
use it in there, go to #6 - 3 wire.
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